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Extension > Garden > SULIS > Maintenance > Sustainable Lawncare Information Series > Understanding and Using Lawn Fertilizers > Types and Forms of Nutrient Sources - Other Essential Nutrient Information

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Types and Forms of Nutrient Sources - Other Essential Nutrient Information

Adequate levels of the other essential elements are usually present in Minnesota lawns. Where deficiencies occur, they are usually associated with extremely sandy, highly acidic, or highly alkaline soils. Where a deficiency is suspected, rely on a soil test and advice from county extension educators as to the traits of soils in your area. For most lawns, attention to nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium is all that is required. The other essential elements and their sources are listed in Table 7.7.

Table 7.7. Elements Essential to Plant Growth and their Sources*

Used in relatively large amounts Used in relatively small amounts
Mostly from air and water Mostly from the soil From the soil
Carbon
Hydrogen
Oxygen
Nitrogen
Phosphorus
Potassium
Sulfur
Calcium
Magnesium
Iron
Manganese
Boron
Molybdenum
Copper
Zinc
Chlorine
Cobalt
Nickel

* N.C. Brady and R.R. Weil. 2002. The Nature and Properties of Soils, 13th Ed., Prentice Hall. Upper Saddle River, N.J.

Adapted from Fertilizing Lawns. University of Minnesota Extension, 2006.

Proceed to Soil Testing.

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