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Extension > Garden > Diagnose a problem > What's wrong with my plant? > Deciduous > Barberry > Spot or blotches on leaves

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Barberry > Leaves > Spot or blotches on leaves

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  • Image: Plum Curculio 1
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Powdery Mildew
Erysiphe pulchra and Phyllactina guttata

  • White spots or blotches on leaves
  • In severe cases leaves may be completely coated with white powdery fungal growth
  • Leaves may be stunted, reddened, scorched and curled or puckered by midseason
  • More common on yellow leaved species
  • More information on Powdery Mildew ...
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  • Image: Plum Curculio 1
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Pear sawfly (pearslug)
Caliroa cerasi

  • Larvae feed on upper surface of leaf between the veins, "windowpaning" the leaf as they feed
  • Damaged leaves often have a grayish appearance before turning brown
  • Leaves may drop prematurely
  • Larvae normally feed about 4 weeks beginning in June; a second generation can start in August
  • Larvae are ½ inch long, shiny, slug-like, and are normally dark olive in color.
  • More information on Pear sawfly ...
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  • Image: Plum Curculio 1
  • Image: Plum Curculio 2
  • Image: Plum Curculio 3

Stem rust
Puccinia graminis

  • Yellow to orange spots that exude sticky honeydew on upper leaf surface in spring
  • Pale orange cup-shaped structures form on underside of leaf below leaf spots and produce powdery orange-yellow colored spores
  • Most common on common barberry (Berberis vulgaris)
  • Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii) is resistant to the disease.

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