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Extension > Food > Food Safety > Preserving and Preparing > Vegetables and Herbs > Canning Beans

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Canning Beans

William Schafer, Food Technologist — Department of Food Science and Nutrition

Revised 2010 by Deb Botzek-Linn, Extension Educator — Food Safety.

Vegetables must be canned in a pressure canner for the correct time and pressure (PSI) to ensure their safety. If not canned correctly, these low acid foods may contain the deadly botulism toxin.

Vegetables may be canned without salt. Salt adds flavor but does not prevent spoilage. If you use a weighted-gauge canner and can at an altitude less than 1000 feet, you may use 10 PSI instead of 15 PSI for the canner pressure. This will improve nutrient and quality retention of the vegetables. Check with your local county extension office or Soil Conservation District for altitude information.

Baked Beans

Procedure: Soak and boil beans. Prepare molasses sauce according to directions for beans with sauce. If desired, place seven 3/4 inch pieces of pork, ham, or bacon in an earthenware crock, a large casserole, or a pan. Add beans and enough molasses sauce to cover beans. Cover and bake 4 to 5 hours at 350° F. Add water as needed about every hour. Fill jars, leaving 1 inch headspace. Adjust lids and process as for beans with sauce.

Dry Beans With Tomato or Molasses Sauce

Quantity: An average of 5 pounds of beans is needed per canner load of 7 quarts; an average of 3-1/4 pounds is needed per canner load of 9 pints – an average of 3/4 pound per quart.

Quality: Select mature, dry beans. Discard discolored beans.

Procedure: Wash dry beans. Add 3 cups of water for each cup of dried beans or peas. Boil 2 minutes, remove from heat, and soak 1 hour and drain. Heat to boiling in fresh water, and save liquid for making sauce one of the sauces below. Fill jars three-fourths full with hot beans. If desired, add a 3/4 inch cube of pork, ham, or bacon to each jar. Fill jars with heated sauce, leaving 1 inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.

Recommended Processes
1) Dial-Gauge Pressure Canner
Pints – 65 minutes 11 PSI
Quarts – 75 minutes 11 PSI

2) Weighted-gauge Pressure Canner
Pints – 65 minutes 15 PSI
Quarts – 75 minutes 15 PSI

Tomato Sauce Method 1: Mix 1 quart tomato juice, 3 tablespoons sugar, 2 teaspoons salt, 1 tablespoon chopped onion and 1/4 teaspoon each of ground cloves, allspice, mace, and cayenne pepper. Heat to boiling.

Tomato Sauce Method 2: Mix 1 cup tomato ketchup with 3 cups cooking liquid from beans and heat to boiling.

Molasses Sauce: Mix 4 cups water or cooking liquid from beans, 3 tablespoons dark molasses, 1 tablespoon vinegar, 2 teaspoons salt, and 3/4 teaspoon powdered dry mustard. Heat to boiling.

Quantity: An average of 28 pounds is needed per canner load of 7 quarts; an average of 18 pounds is needed per canner load of 9 pints. A bushel weighs 32 pounds and yields 6 to 10 quarts ÷ an average of 4 pounds per quart.

Quality: Select well-filled pods with green seeds. Discard insect-damaged and diseased seeds.

Procedure: Shell beans and wash thoroughly.

Hot pack: Cover beans with boiling water and heat to boil. Fill jars loosely, leaving 1 inch headspace.

Raw pack: Fill jars with raw beans. Do not press or shake down. For small beans, leave 1 inch of headspace for pints and 1-1/2 inches for quarts. For large beans leave 1 inch of headspace for pints and 1-1/4 inches for quarts. Add 1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Add boiling water, leaving the same headspaces listed above. Adjust lids and process.

Recommended Processes (Hot and Raw Pack)
1) Dial-Gauge Pressure Canner
Pints – 40 minutes 11 PSI
Quarts – 50 minutes 11 PSI

2) Weighted-Gauge Pressure Canner
Pints – 40 minutes 15 PSI
Quarts – 50 minutes 15 PSI

Shelled and Dried Beans or Peas (all varieties)

Quantity: An average of 5 pounds is needed per canner load of 7 quarts; an average of 3-1/4 pounds is needed per canner load of 9 pints – an average of 3/4 pound per quart.

Quality: Select mature, dry beans or peas. Discard those that are discolored.

Procedure: Place dried beans or peas in a large pot and cover with water. Soak 12 to 18 hours in a cool place. Drain water. To quickly hydrate beans, you may cover sorted and washed beans with boiling water in a saucepan. Boil 2 minutes, remove from heat, soak 1 hour and drain. Cover beans soaked by either method with fresh water and boil 30 minutes. Add 1/2 teaspoon of salt per pint or 1 teaspoon per quart to the jar, if desired. Fill jars with beans or peas and cooking water, leaving 1 inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.

Recommended Processes
1) Dial-gauge Pressure Canner
Pints – 75 minutes 11 PSI
Quarts – 90 minutes PSI

2) Weighted-gauge Pressure Canner
Pints – 75 minutes 15 PSI
Quarts – 90 minutes 15 PSI

Snap and Italian Beans (green and wax)

Quantity: An average of 14 pounds is needed per canner load of 7 quarts; an average of 9 pounds is needed per canner load of 9 pints. A bushel weighs 30 pounds and yields 12 to 20 quarts – an average of 2 pounds per quart.

Quality: Select filled but tender, crisp pods. Remove and discard diseased and rusty pods.

Procedure: Wash beans and trim ends. Leave whole or cut/snap into 1 inch pieces.

Hot pack: Cover with boiling water and boil 5 minutes. Fill jars loosely, leaving 1 inch headspace.

Raw pack: Fill jars tightly with raw beans, leaving 1 inch headspace. Add 1 teaspoon of canning salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Add boiling water, leaving 1 inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.

Recommended Processes ((Hot and Raw Pack)
1) Dial-Gauge Pressure Canner
Pints – 20 minutes 11 PSI
Quarts – 25 minutes 11 PSI

2) Weighted-Gauge Pressure Canner
Pints – 20 minutes 15 PSI
Quarts – 25 minutes 15 PSI

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