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Extension > Food > Farm to School > Minnesota Toolkit for School Foodservice > Using Food > Using Sweet Corn

Using Sweet Corn

corn

Quantity Recipes

Home Recipes

Corn on the Cob

Number of portions: 10

Portion size: 1 medium ear

  • 10 medium ears of white, yellow, or bi-color sweet corn
  • 2 gallons of water

Put water in a large covered pot and bring to a boil over high heat.

Husk the corn. If needed, run your hand down each ear to remove extra silk.

Carefully add ears of corn to boiling water. Return to a boil and turn down heat to low.

Cover pot and cook for 5 to 10 minutes or until corn kernels are just tender.

Serve with margarine and salt, if desired.

 

corn

Menu Example 1: Sweet Corn on the Cob

Cheese Burger on Whole Wheat Bun
Corn on the Cob
Watermelon Wedge

Frozen Fruit Juice Cup
Sliced Wheat Bread
Low Fat Milk Varieties

Food Component and Menu Item

GRADES
K-6

GRADES
7-12

OPTIONAL
GRADES K-3

Meat or Meat Alternate:
Hamburger with Cheese
Slice (1 = 2 ½ ounces)

2 ounces

2 ounces

1 ½ ounces

Vegetable:
Corn on the Cob

¼ to ½ cup

½ cup

¼ to ½ cup

Fruit:
Watermelon Wedge
(1 Wedge = ½ Cup)
Frozen Fruit Juice Cup
(1= ¼ Cup Fruit)

¼ to ½ cup
(Vegetables and Fruits must = ¾ cup/day + an extra ½ cup/week)

½ cup

¼ to ½ cup
(Vegetables and Fruits must = ¾ cup/day)

Grains/Bread:
Whole Wheat Bun (1 Bun =
2 Servings)
Sliced Wheat Bread
(1 Slice = 1 Serving)

12 servings per week – minimum of 1 serving per day

15 servings per week – minimum of 1 serving per day

10 servings per week – minimum of 1 serving per day

Milk: As Beverage

8 fluid ounces

8 fluid ounces

8 fluid ounces

corn
  • Because sweet corn comes from a grain plant, it contains some nutrients that are commonly found in grains but not in most vegetables — as well as typical vegetable nutrients like vitamin C. Source: Cornell University
  • Yellow varieties of sweet corn supply the antioxidant lutein, a carotene, which may contribute to good eye health. Source: Environmental Nutrition, August 2002
  • Raw vegetables aren't always better for you than cooked. Cooking sweet corn for 10 minutes actually increases the amount of antioxidants that can be absorbed and used by the human body. Cooked sweet corn is a good dietary source of the antioxidant ferulic acid, which may help prevent cancer. Source: Cornell University
  • Sweet corn provides thiamin, niacin and magnesium. Source: Environmental Nutrition, August 2002
  • Sweet corn is a good source of folate, which may prevent birth defects and heart disease. Source: Environmental Nutrition, August 2002
  • One medium ear of cooked sweet corn provides about 110 calories and 2.9 grams of dietary fiber. Source: USDA Nutrient Database
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