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Extension > Family > Parents Forever™ > For Families > Resources for Families > Taking Care of Yourself > Emotional and Social Changes > Safety Planning in Abusive Relationships

Emotional and Social Changes

Safety Planning in Abusive Relationships

Wendy Rubinyi, Instructional Design Specialist — Independent Contractor; Minnell L. Tralle, Extension Educator — Family Resiliency; and Heather M. Lee, Project Manager

January 2012

A safety plan is a personalized, practical plan that includes ways to keep your family safe. The National Domestic Violence Hotline offers the following safety plan suggestions.

While in an Abusive Relationship

Consider the following safety plan suggestions.

While Preparing to Leave an Abusive Relationship

Consider the following safety plan suggestions.

After Leaving an Abusive Relationship

Consider the following safety plan suggestions.

Technology Safety

Follow these general safety tips for using technology.

Following these suggestions is not a guarantee of safety, but applying them to your own situation could increase your level of safety in an abusive relationship. You may be able to complete a more detailed, specific safety plan with a local domestic violence advocate. Look in a phone book under domestic violence, women’s shelters, or crisis intervention. You many also call your county social service agency to find a local contact or review the resources available through the National Domestic Violence Hotline (1-800-799-SAFE).

Sources

National Domestic Abuse Hotline. (2013). Safety planning with children.

National Domestic Abuse Hotline. (2013). What is safety planning?

Related Resources

What Is Safety Planning?The National Domestic Violence Hotline — Get to know more about safety planning, including ensuring your computer or phone are safe, making plans to leave a relationship, and more.

Minnesota’s Domestic Violence Services and ProgramsMinnesota Coalition for Battered Women — Find the contact information for a domestic violence program near you to get the help you need.

How to Spot Child Abuse Child abuse can be physical, sexual, or emotional. Neglect is also a form of child abuse. Learn how to recognize the signs of child abuse

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