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Lessons from the Field

Traumatic Stress Series

native american maleUnbarred: Strengthening Families Affected by Incarceration

November 14, 2013

The symposium highlighted the too often silent population of children and youth with an incarcerated parent and featured "Mothers of Bedford," a documentary film about Bedford Hills, a maximum security prison, and the lives of incarcerated women and their families. Click on "More information" for Q&A responses.

  1. Brad Trelstad from Ramsey County Sheriff's Office (brad.trelstad@co.ramsey.mn.us) is interested in being part of a mailing list for any groups regarding trainings/events/workshops on this topic.

    Answer: Regarding Brad's question about a listserv — I'd encourage folks who are interested in this topic to reach out to the Collaborative so they can be added to that list. I generally send announcements to the Collaborative for distribution and I know others do, too. Chris Harnack should be able to add folks easily, as the communication most often comes from her. Her email is charnack@voamn.org and she's one of the co-chairs (so is Lee Buckley who could probably make sure that Brad and others get added).

  2. This question is for Lori and Rebecca — We are interested in knowing about parenting education curriculum that is well suited for parents who are incarcerated in county jails as well as state prison. Lori mentioned “realistic parenting skills” as being a goal of parenting education for this audience. Do they have a curriculum they can share?

    Answer: Regarding the parenting curriculum — this is a HUGE challenge. I just had a Masters in Public Health student tell me that she searched and searched for parenting education curriculums relevant for incarcerated parents. Few of them have been "manualized" that I'm aware of. Mark Eddy's group in Washington State has a program (www.parentinginsideout.org/curriculum/) that is evidenced-based, but it is quite expensive and it's been only used in prisons, to the best of my knowledge. Our work is really specific to pregnant and parenting women in prison, so I'm not sure how relevant that would be either. Perhaps Ebony Ruhland could share what the CCJ curriculum looks like that they use in the men's facilities.

  3. A comment: Back to keeping offenders close to where their families are, is not all that possible. Many of the victims families request them to be moved away. Thank you. DOC FRB

    The point about offenders being moved to facilities that are closer to home is an important one — it's not as easy as it sounds, particularly in Minnesota where the facilities are organized by offense type as Warden Miles described. I'm not actually sure how many families request to be "far away" from the offender; I suspect this is more often the case when one of the family members is the victim of the parent's crime, but I'm not sure how common this is or if there are data out there on this.

Presenter Panel

See the Presenter Bios (568 K PDF)

Video and Presentation Materials

Setting the Stage: Research Perspectives (11.8 MB PDF) — Presentation notes from Rebecca Shlafer, PhD, University of Minnesota, Department of Pediatrics, Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health

Prison Culture (904 K PDF) — Presentation notes from Eddie Miles, Lino Lakes Correctional Facility

Isis Rising: Prison Doula Program at Shakopee Women’s Prison (465 K PDF) — Presentation notes from Erica Gerrity, LICSW, Isis Rising, Prison Doula Program

Mind the Gap: Transitioning to Life After Incarceration (359 K PDF) — Presentation notes from Lori Lofrano, Minnesota Department of Corrections

Prison Visitation: How Can We Promote Safe and Meaningful Visits? (52 K PDF) — Presentation notes from Lee Buckley, Department of Corrections

Agenda (513 K PDF)

Goals and Objectives (3.7 MB PDF)

Resources Related To Unbarred: Strengthening Families Affected By Incarceration (552 K PDF)

Homeless Children and Youth: Opening the Doors of Intervention and Policy

April 5, 2013

Gain a better understanding of the causes, as well as intervention and prevention strategies, for the growing number of homeless children and adolescents in Minnesota. Presenters highlight one intervention program in Ramsey County for discussion.

This Lesson from the Field aims to facilitate professionals’ use of a broad and inclusive lens in their work with children, youth, and families impacted by homelessness by restoring and promoting emotional, psychological, and physical safety and promoting healing and wellness through direct interventions or appropriate referrals.

Presenter Panel

See the Presenter Bios (557 K PDF).

Video and Presentation Materials

Understanding Immigration and Refugee Trauma: What Do We Need to Know and How Do We Intervene?

January 17, 2013

Find out how child and adolescent professionals address health and education inequities and health disparities in ways that promote mental health, personal safety, and educational success for immigrant children and youth. Presenters discussed traumatic stresses associated with immigration and different approaches and interventions, such as a photo-voice project with Hispanic youth to promote mental health.

This Lesson from the Field aims to facilitate professionals’ use of a broad and inclusive lens in their work with children, youth, and families impacted by homelessness by restoring and promoting emotional and psychological safety and promoting healing and wellness.

Presenter Panel

See the Presenter Bios (543 K PDF).

Video and Presentation Materials

Historical and Generational Trauma: Significance and Response

October 18, 2012

Hear about historical and generational trauma from the perspective of American Indians and African Americans and builds on Dr. Karina Walter’s presentation (see Historical Trauma, Microagressions, and Identity: A Framework for Culturally-Based Practice). A panel of community and university professionals discussed cultural ways of knowing, how healing and wellness take place within families and communities, and where the science of historical and intergenerational trauma currently exists.

This Lesson from the Field aims to facilitate professionals’ use of a broad and inclusive lens in their work with children, youth, and families impacted by historical and generational trauma to restore and promote cultural identity and promote healing and wellness.

Presenter Panel

See the Presenter Bios (647 K PDF).

Video and Presentation Materials

Traumatic Stress and Youth: How Do We Intervene with Our Most Difficult Teens?

March 29, 2012

Review the research on protective factors that promote teen reliance, adolescent brain development, social emotional learning, and the role of lifestyle in teen stress and coping. Features a presentation on how to best serve American Indian adolescents and children.

This Lesson from the Field aims to facilitate professionals’ use of a broad and inclusive lens in their work with school-age children, youth, and families who have experienced adversity and traumatic stress in order to promote security, safety, and well-being.

Presenter Panel

See the Presenter Bios (536 K PDF).

Video and Presentation Materials

Trauma and Children: A Model Program for Trauma-focused Care and Why it Works

October 20, 2011

Get an overview of trauma-focused care and a summary of what the research tells us and where to go from here. One intervention model — “The Nursery Way” — will be highlighted, with discussion on how this program has significantly impacted staff’s interactions with others and how it helped staff care for themselves in the midst of emotionally challenging work.

This Lesson from the Field aims to facilitate professionals’ use of a trauma lens in their work with children and families to promote security, safety, and well-being.

Presenter Panel

Video and Presentation Materials

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