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Extension > Agriculture > Crops > Soybean > Soybean cyst nematode management guide

Soybean cyst nematode management guide

Soybean cyst nematode is a number one yield robber of soybeans. It has infested more than 50% of fields in Minnesota, and should be managed appropriately for profitable soybean production.

Download guide as PDF (1.3 MB)

In this guide:

  1. Where is the soybean cyst nematode found?
  2. How important is the soybean cyst nematode?
  3. What is the soybean cyst nematode? What is its life cycle?
  4. How does the soybean cyst nematode damage soybeans? What symptoms does it cause?
  5. How do soybean cyst nematode populations change over time?
  6. How does the soybean cyst nematode spread?
  7. How do I know if I have the soybean cyst nematode in my fields?
  8. How do I take soil samples for detecting the soybean cyst nematode?
  9. How often, when, and how should I take soil samples for soybean cyst nematode counts to help make management decisions?
  10. What are HG Types?
    1. Which HG Types are found in Minnesota?
    2. MN HG Type Test
  11. How can I manage the soybean cyst nematode?
    1. How should the SCN-resistant varieties be used?
    2. How can crop rotation be used to manage the soybean cyst nematode?
    3. Can spreading of the soybean cyst nematode be prevented?
    4. How important is crop health management for minimizing soybean cyst nematode damage?
    5. Do chemical and biological controls have potential in soybean cyst nematode management?
  12. What are scientists projecting for the future of soybean cyst nematode?

Editor: Senyu Chen, Professor, Southern Research and Outreach Center, University of Minnesota

Contributors: James Kurle, Associate Professor, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Minnesota; Dean Malvick, Associate Professor, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Minnesota; Bruce Potter, Assistant Professor, Southwest Research and Outreach Center, University of Minnesota; James Orf, Professor, Department of Agronomy and Plant Genetics, University of Minnesota

Published February 2012

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