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Extension > Agriculture > Crops > Small Grains Production > The Small Grains Field Guide > Fertility Management of Oats

Fertility management of oats

NOTE: This is an excerpt adapted from the Small Grains Field Guide.

Nitrogen Nitrogen recommendations are formulated in two different ways depending on geography. In eastern Minnesota, soil testing is not used to formulate an N recommendation (Table 3.1). In western Minnesota and the entire state of North Dakota, soil testing for nitrate is recommended to determine N application rates.

Table 3.1 Nitrogen recommendations for oats in eastern Minnesota where the soil nitrate test is not used.

Crop grown last year Organic1 Matter level 40-60 61-80 81-100 101-120 121+
Alfalfa (4+plants/ft2, Non-harvested sweet clover

low

medium/high

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Soybeans

low

medium/high

0

0

20

10

40

30

60

50

80

70

Edible beans, field peas, harvested sweet clover

low

medium

0

0

20

25

40

40

60

55

80

70

Any crop in Table 2, Group 1

low

medium

0

0

0

0

0

0

25

15

45

35

Any crop in Table 2, Group 2

low

medium

40

30

60

50

80

70

100

90

120

110

1low=less than 3%; medium and high = 3% or more.

Phosphate and Potash Recommendations for phosphate (P2O5) and potash (K2O) are based on yield goal and soil test levels. These recommendations are provided in Table 8. Rates for broadcast are given, but these rates can be reduced by half in Minnesota or a third in North Dakota if band applied near or with the seed because of the increased efficiency of banded applications. Limits of fertilizer rates that can be applied with oats at planting are the same as those for wheat (Table 1.4 on page 62).

Table 3.2 Phosphate and potassium recommendations for oats in Minnesota and North Dakota.

Phosphate and potassium recommendatiosn for oats in Minnesota and North Dakota

Suggested use of other nutrients The work done in North Dakota with nutrients other than N, P and K suggest that their application is not generally important in achieving acceptable oat yield. Emphasis should be given to efficient and effective management of N, P, and K in the production of high yield, high quality oats.


Authors: George Rehm and Dave Franzen

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