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Extension > Agriculture > Dairy Extension > Feed and Nutrition > Feeding the dairy herd > Table 6-10

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Feeding the dairy herd

Table 2-5 Table of Contents Table 11-14

TABLE 6. COMPOSITION AND CHARACTERISTICS OF COLOSTRUM, WHOLE MILK AND RECONSTITUTED MILK REPLACER (1 LB POWDER + 7 LB WATER)

Item First
milking
Second
milking
Second
day
Third
day
Whole
milk
Reconstituted
milk
replacer

Specific gravity, g/ml 1.056 1.040 1.034 1.033 1.032
Total solids, % 23.9 17.9 14.0 13.6 12.9 12.5
Fat, % 6.7 5.4 4.1 4.3 4.0 2.5
Nonfat solids, % 16.7 12.2 9.6 9.5 8.8 11.25
Protein, % 14.0 8.4 4.6 4.1 3.1 2.8
Lactose, % 2.7 3.9 4.5 4.7 5.0 variable
Ash, % 1.1 1.0 .8 .8 .7 variable
Vitamin A, g/100 ml295.0 190.0 95.0 74.0 34.0 variable
Immunoglobulins, % 6.0 4.2 1.0  –   –  0

Back: Comparing colostrum, transitional milk, milk and milk replacer

TABLE 7. PROTEIN SOURCES IN MILK REPLACERS

A. Optimum
B. Good
C. Inferior
Skim milk powder Chemically modified soy protein Meat solubles
Buttermilk powder Soy concentrate Fish protein concentrate
Dried whole whey Soy isolates Distillers' dried solubles
De-lactosed whey Brewer's dried yeast
Casein Oat flour
Milk albumin Wheat flour

Back: Comparing colostrum, transitional milk, milk and milk replacer

TABLE 8. EXAMPLES OF SOME CALF STARTERS

Grain starters1
1 2 3

Ingredients (air dry basis)
Corn (cracked or coarse ground), % 43.5 29.0 57.0
Oats (rolled or crushed), % 28.0 20.0
Barley (rolled or coarse ground), % 20.0
Soybean meal, % 20.0 14.3 16.0
Distillers grains, % 9.0
Alfalfa, % 20.0
Molasses, % 5.0 5.0 5.0
Dicalcium phosphate, % .7 .6 .9
Limestone, % 1.7 1.8 .8
TM salt and vitamins, % .3 .3 .3
Composition (DM basis)
Crude protein, % 18.5 18.0 18.5
TDN, % 82.0 81.5 81.4
ADF, % 8.0 8.8 9.2
Calcium, % .4 .9 .9
Phosphorus, % .5 .5 .5
Vitamin A, IU/lb 1500 1500 1500
Vitamin D, IU/lb 500 500 500
Vitamin E, IU/lb 11 11 11

1Hay may be offered free choice with starters 1 and 2.

Back: Starter rations

TABLE 9. HEIFER GRAIN GUIDELINES ACCORDING TO FORAGE QUALITY FOR 1.8 POUNDS PER DAY GAIN

Heifer weight
Forage Quality 200-400 500-700 800-1000 over 1000

lb of grain/heifer/day
Legume-Grass
Excellent 2-3 0 0 0
Very good 3-4 1-2 1 0
Fair 4-5 4-5 3-4 3-4
Grass
Excellent 3-4 0-2 0 0
Very good 4-5 2-3 2-3 2-3
Fair 5-6 4-5 4-5 4-5

Back: Heifer Nutrition

TABLE 10. DESIRABLE WEIGHTS AND BODY CONDITION SCORES FOR DAIRY HEIFERS

Age in months Body Condition Score Brown Swiss or Holstein Ayrshire M. Shorthorn
or Guernsey
Jersey

lb
Birth 90 – 100 65 – 75 55 – 60
1 120 – 130 90 – 100 70 – 80
2 2.2 170 – 190 150 —160 110 —120
4 2.2 275 – 300 240 – 250 190 – 200
6 2.3 390 – 410 320 – 340 270 – 280
12 2.8 740 – 760 590 – 610 510 – 520
14* 3.0 800 – 850 670 – 690 570 – 600
18 3.2 1050 – 1100 850 – 870 750 – 775
22 3.5 1250 – 1300 1025 – 1075 900 – 950

*Breed heifers in this weight range. Heifers should weigh about 60% of their mature weight when bred. With proper feeding, heifers should reach these weights and have good skeletal growth at 14 to 16 months of age.

Back: Feeding program for heifers 1 to 2 years of age (to 2 months before parturition)

 

Table 2-5 Table of Contents Table 11-14
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