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Extension > Garden > Yard and Garden > Landscaping > The Best Plants for 30 Tough Sites

The Best Plants for 30 Tough Sites

Edited by Mery Meyer, Deb Brown and Mike Zins, Extension Horticulturists, University of Minnesota.
Copyright © 2013 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.

The cover of the small grains field guide

Introduction

This bulletin is written in celebration of 30 years of Master Gardener teaching in Minnesota. Here are the BEST plants for 30 tough garden sites: dry shade, slopes, lakeshores, all locations that call for tough, durable plants. Also included are hard-to-find plant lists of special traits and useful characteristics: self-seeding, fragrance, long-blooming, minimal litter trees. And who better to recommend these plants than the University of Minnesota Extension Service Master Gardeners? Drawing on their 30 years of teaching and experience, Master Gardeners list here their selections for these tough sites.

Inside you will find...

  • What can I plant under a black walnut?
  • What will grow in alkaline soil?
  • What is a good small tree for a boulevard?
  • What tree is good for my compacted soil?
  • What will grow in dry shade, under trees?

About the University of Minnesota Master Gardeners

The University of Minnesota Extension Service Master Gardeners are volunteers who teach horticulture throughout the state. More than 5,000 Master Gardeners have taken the training, started in 1977 by Mike Zins, now retired U of M Extension Horticulturist. About 2,500 are currently active volunteers teaching in schools, nursing homes, community education programs, community gardens, farmers’ markets, at county fairs and the state fair and answering phone and email questions. Most counties in Minnesota have active Master Gardeners that extend the research-based gardening information from the University of Minnesota to the public. To contact a Master Gardener near you or to learn more about the program and how you can become a Master Gardener, visit the Master Gardener website. For more gardening information see: www.extension.umn.edu.

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