Skip to Main navigation Skip to Left navigation Skip to Main content Skip to Footer

University of Minnesota Extension
www.extension.umn.edu
612-624-1222

Extension > Family > Live Healthy, Live Well > Healthy Wallets > Adjusting to Income Loss

Print Icon Email Icon Share Icon

Healthy Wallets

Adjusting to Income Loss

Income loss happens to most of us at some point in our life. No matter if you have been laid off, had your work hours reduced, took a pay cut, retired, went on family medical leave, or became a single parent household, the results are the same: income loss. How you respond to the income changes financial, emotionally, and socially can make a difference for you and your family's long-term financial security. Use these resources to get started today.

Planning to $tay Ahead


A spending and savings plan (sometimes called a “budget”) is a way to divide your
available money to meet your needs and wants.

Why have a spending plan?

Families say that making a spending and savings plan helps them feel as if they’re
more in charge of their money. They say that it helps them:

  • Stretch dollars and get more for their limited money.
  • Work toward their goals with the amount of income that they have.
  • Spend wisely.
  • Set aside a little money each month as savings, or for emergencies.

You can make a spending plan by following these steps.

  • Step 1: Know how much money you have coming in each month.
  • Step 2: Find out how you usually spend your money.
  • Step 3: Make a plan for how you will spend your money in the future.
    • Your spending plan might include ideas for how to meet your needs and wants for less money.
    • A spending plan includes a way to put some money aside for unexpected expenses.
    • A spending plan for your family should include ways to meet goals.

An important part of making a spending plan work is keeping track of bills that you have and paying them on time. Here are some hints:

  • Decide who will pay bills, and choose one place to keep records and bills.
  • Open a bill as soon as it comes. Look at the due date. Write it on your calendar. Then put it in a safe place with other bills.
  • Pay bills on time to avoid late fees and interest costs. Have a regular time each week to check the bills that need to be paid.
  • When paying bills by mail, use personal checks or money orders. Do not send cash. Some banks offer free or low-cost checking accounts.
  • Get a receipt when you pay in person with cash.
  • Keep receipts for large expense items, or items that you may need to return.

When you are short on cash, beware of payday loans. Payday loans are an expensive way to get cash. With these loans, the borrower writes a check to a payday loan or check-loan business for the loan amount plus a fee. The lender agrees to hold the check until the date the loan is due. On the due date, the lender deposits the check or you can give the check-loan business the amount due in cash or money order and get your check back from them.

Check-loan businesses are required by law to tell the consumer the cost of the loan — both in a dollar amount and as an Annual Percentage Rate (APR). Let’s say you write a personal check for $120 to borrow $100 for up to 14 days. This $20 finance charge is an annual percentage rate of 521 percent!

Although they are a convenient way to obtain short-term cash, payday loans can put you deeper in debt. Consider other options before choosing a payday loan:

  • Check out the cost of a loan from a bank, savings and loan institution, or credit union.
  • Find out the APR for a cash advance on your credit card.
  • If it’s a utility bill that’s due, check first with the utility company about emergency assistance programs.
  • Ask your creditors for more time to pay your bills. Be sure to find out what the charge will be for paying late.
  • If you’re having trouble paying bills, seek debt counseling.

Better management of money may help avoid the need for payday loans. Tracking income and expenses can help borrowers develop a spending plan that includes savings and emergencies.

For more information, visit our website at z.umn.edu/afimpact/.

Planear para $alir Adelante


Un plan de gastos y ahorros (a veces se llama un “presupuesto”) es una manera de distribuir el dinero que tiene disponible para satisfacer sus necesidades y deseos.

¿Por qué es importante un plan de gastos?

Hay familias que dicen que cuando preparan un plan de gastos y ahorros sienten que tienen más control de su dinero. Por ejemplo, les ayuda a:

  • Estirar el dinero para obtener más con sus limitados ingresos.
  • Lograr sus objectivos con la cantidad de ingresos que tienen.
  • Gastar con prudencia.
  • Guardar una pequeña cantidad de dinero cada mes para ahorros o emergencias.

Usted puede crear un plan de gastos siguiendo los siguientes pasos.

  • Paso 1: Saber cuánto dinero tendrá disponible cada mes.
  • Paso 2: Averiguar como gasta su dinero usualmente.
  • Paso 3: Preparar un plan para determinar como gastará su dinero en el futuro.
    • Su plan de gastos puede incluir ideas de cómo satisfacer sus necesidades y deseos con menos dinero.
    • Un plan de gastos incluye una método para guardar una cantidad de dinero para gastos imprevistos.
    • Un plan de gastos para su familia debe incluir un método de cumplir los objetivos de la familia.

Para que un plan de gastos funcione bien es necesario saber cuáles son las cuentas que usted tiene y pagarlas a tiempo. Estos son algunos consejos:

  • Decida quién pagará las cuentas, y escoja un lugar para guardar los documentos y cuentas.
  • Abra las cuentas tan pronto lleguen. Fíjese en la fecha de vencimiento. Anótela en su calendario. Después póngala en un lugar seguro con las otras cuentas.
  • Pague las cuentas a tiempo para evitar multas y costos de intereses. Deje un día específico cada semana para revisar las cuentas que debe pagar.
  • Cuando paga las cuentas por correo, utilice cheques personales o giros postales. No envie efectivo. Algunos bancos ofrecen cuentas corrientes gratis o de bajo costo.
  • Pida un recibo cuando paga en persona con efectivo.
  • Guarde los recibos para artículos caros o artículos que tal vez tenga que devolver.

Cuando usted está corto de dinero, cuidado con los préstamos del día de pago. Préstamos del día de pago son una manera de obtener efectivo muy cara. Con estos préstamos, el prestatario escribe un cheque a la empresa de préstamos del día de pago para la cantidad del préstamo más un cargo. El prestamista promete guardar el cheque hasta la fecha de vencimiento del cheque. En la fecha de vencimiento, el prestamista deposita el cheque o usted puede pagarle a la empresa de préstamos la cantidad pendiente en efectivo o giro postal y obtener su cheque de vuelta.

La ley obliga a las empresas prestamistas a decirle al consumidor el costo del préstamo — tanto la cantidad en dólares como la tasa de interés anual (APR por sus siglas en inglés). Digamos que usted escribe un cheque por $120 para pedir prestado $100 por hasta 14 días. ¡Este cargo de financiamiento de $20 es una tasa de interés anual de 521 por ciento!

Aunque es una manera conveniente de obtener efectivo al corto plazo, los préstamos el día de pago pueden endeudarle más. Considere otras opciones antes de escoger un préstamo del día de pago:

  • Investigue el costo de un préstamo de un banco, asociación de ahorro y crédito inmobiliario o unión crediticia.
  • Averigüe la tasa de interés anual de un adelanto de efectivo en su tarjeta de crédito.
  • Si es una cuenta para un servicio público que tiene que pagar, solicite información en la empresa de servicios públicos sobre programas de asistencia para emergencias.
  • Solicite más tiempo a sus acreedores para pagar sus cuentas. Asegúrese averiguar ual será el cargo por pagos atrasados.
  • Si se le está dificultando pagar sus cuentas a tiempo, solicite asesoramiento en la liquidación de deudas.

Una mejor administración de su dinero puede evitar la necesidad de préstamos del día de pago. El seguir la pista de sus ingresos y gastos puede ayudar a los prestatarios a formular un plan de gastos que incluye ahorros para emergencias.

Por más información visita este sitio web: z.umn.edu/afimpact/.

Setting Spending Priorities


Faced with reduced income or increased expenses, you'll need to develop a spending plan to help you pay your bills. If your income will be affected for more than a month, adjust your spending habits to maintain control of family finances over an extended period.

Many people try to hide financial problems from themselves or family members. Not facing your problems can be very destructive because the worry and stress caused by financial uncertainty and lack of cash may be worse than the financial problem itself. It's important to look realistically at your situation and actively seek solutions to your problems, despite the discomfort.

Because spending decisions affect the whole family, talk with your family about the situation. Let them know the family needs to change its spending. Involve everyone in deciding spending priorities. If family members understand the tough choices that must be made and have a voice in making the decisions, they will be more willing to accept the decisions.

As your family talks about what is most important, be sure to listen to what they say. Supporting each other can help you pull together as a family and get through these tough times.

A spending plan is always an effective tool to help you get the most for your money. It is even more important when you have a sudden change in your income. A spending plan helps you to make decisions about how to spend your money, provide for needs before wants, match your spending to your current income, and prevent family arguments over money.

There are three steps to make a spending plan.

Step 1: Determine Your Income

Add up your current total family income from all sources. Include income from other family members if it is used for family expenses. Use the take-home amount, or what you actually have to spend after deductions.

Do you receive income from any of these sources?

  • Earnings from employed family members
  • Unemployment Compensation
  • Withdrawal from savings
  • Tips or commissions
  • Interest or dividends
  • Social Security
  • Child support or alimony
  • Public assistance
  • Veterans benefits

Write down your income before it was reduced AND the adjusted amount.

Step 2: Determine Your Monthly Expenses

If you had a spending plan before your income was reduced, you probably know how much you were spending for monthly expenses. If not, use old records, canceled checks, bills and receipts to figure out how much you spent on the following categories.

  • Housing
  • Utilities
  • Food
  • Transportation
  • Medical Care
  • Credit Payments
  • Insurance
  • Household Operations and Maintenance
  • Clothing and Personal Care
  • Education and Recreation
  • Miscellaneous

Remember, not all of your expenses are monthly. Property taxes, insurance premiums and holiday gifts or family event gifts come only periodically. It's easy to forget about them and then not have the money to pay for them. You will need to set aside some money in your monthly spending plan to meet these occasional costs.

As you think about what you were spending and try to plan how much you can now spend, ask these questions:

  • Which expenses are essential to the family’s well-being?
  • Which expenses have the highest priority?
  • Which areas can be reduced to keep family spending within its income?
  • How much can you afford to spend in each category?

Adjust the amounts you spend in each expense category and write down the new amount next to it.

Step 3: Balance Income and Expenses

Add up your adjusted expenses and compare the total to your current income. When your income is reduced, it may be very difficult to stay within your income. What can you do if your expenses are greater than your income?

  • Cut spending.
  • Increase your income. What are the possibilities for part-time or temporary work to help supplement your income? Are you now eligible for public assistance programs that help you obtain needs such as food?
  • Look at your other assets. What savings, investments or property do you have that could be used or converted to cash to meet expenses? Keep in mind that borrowing and using savings may be only temporary solutions.
  • Reduce your fixed expenses. If too much of your income is going to fixed expenses such as housing or debt payments, there may not be enough money left to cover your other living expenses. You may need to refinance your loans, move to lower-cost housing, or surrender the property to your creditor to get out from under some of your debt.

Once you have a spending plan that sets spending amounts for essential family needs and balances your spending with your income, you'll have to stick to it. Writing it down is not enough. You must use the plan to guide your spending.

Keep a record of what you spend in each expense category to be sure you don't exceed the amount on your spending plan. A family record or expense book can help you list your expenditures and compare them to your spending plan. Computer spreadsheet programs and smart phone apps are options for tracking expenses, too. By keeping track of what you have spent, it's easier to control your spending and live within your income.

For more information, visit our website at z.umn.edu/afimpact/.

¿Cómo establecer las prioridades de gastos?


Al hacer frente a un ingreso inferior o a un aumento en los gastos, usted necesitará crear un plan de gastos que le ayude a pagar sus cuentas. Si su ingreso se ve afectado por más de un mes, modifique los hábitos de gasto para mantener el control de las finanzas de la familia por un periodo prolongado.

Muchas personas se engañan a sí mismas en cuanto a los problemas financieros o tratan de esconderlos de los miembros de familia. El no enfrentar sus problemas puede ser perjudicial debido a que la preocupación y el estrés ocasionado por la inseguridad económica y la falta de efectivo pueden llegar a ser peor que el problema financiero mismo. Es importante ver su situación de una manera realista y buscar las soluciones a sus problemas de manera activa a pesar del desasosiego.

Debido a que las decisiones sobre los gastos afectan a toda la familia, hable con su familia sobre la situación. Hágales saber que la familia necesita hacer cambios en sus gastos. Incluya a todos en la toma de decisión sobre las prioridades de gasto. Si los miembros de la familia comprenden que deben tomar decisiones difíciles y tienen voz en la toma de decisiones, ellos estarán más dispuestos a aceptar las decisiones.

A medida que su familia habla sobre lo que es más importante asegúrese de prestar atención a lo que tengan que decir. El apoyo entre sí puede ayudar a aunar su esfuerzo como familia y a salir adelante de estos momentos difíciles.

Un plan de gastos es siempre una herramienta efectiva que le ayudará a aprovechar al máximo su dinero. Es más importante aún cuando tiene un cambio repentino en su ingreso. Un plan de gastos le ayuda a tomar decisiones sobre cómo gastar su dinero, proveer de lo que necesita antes que los gustos, emparejar sus gastos con su ingreso actual, y evitar las discusiones sobre dinero con la familia.

Hay tres pasos para hacer un plan de gastos.

Paso 1: Determinar su ingreso

Sume el ingreso actual de toda la familia incluyendo todos los ingresos. Si el ingreso de los otros miembros de la familia se usa para los gastos de la familia súmelos también. Use la cantidad que lleva a casa o lo que usted dispone verdaderamente para gastar después de las deducciones.

¿Recibe usted ingreso de alguna de las siguientes fuentes?

  • Ganancias de los miembros de familia que están empleados
  • Beneficios por desempleo
  • Retiro de ahorros
  • Propinas o comisiones
  • Intereses o dividendos
  • Seguridad social
  • Manutención al menor o cuota alimentaria
  • Asistencia pública
  • Beneficios a veteranos

Anote su ingreso antes de que se redujo y la cantidad modificada actual.

Paso 2: Determinar sus gastos mensuales

Si usted tenía un plan de gastos antes tener una reducción en su ingreso, es probable que usted sepa cuánto estaba gastando en los gastos mensuales. Si no sabe busque las anotaciones anteriores, cheques cobrados, cuentas y recibos para ver cuánto gastaba en las siguientes clasificaciones:

  • Vivienda
  • Servicios públicos
  • Alimentos
  • Transporte
  • Gastos medicos
  • Pago de créditos
  • Seguro
  • Funcionamiento del hogar y mantenimiento
  • Cuidado personal y prendas de vestir
  • Educación y recreación
  • Misceláneos

Recuerde que no todos sus gastos son mensuales. Los impuestos a la propiedad, la prima del seguro y los regalos para las fiestas o regalos por eventos familiares solo son gastos periódicos. Es fácil olvidarse de ellos y luego no tener dinero para pagar. Usted tendrá que guardar algún dinero en su plan de gastos para cubrir estos gastos ocasionales.

A medida que piensa en sus gastos y trata de planificar cuánto puede ahora gastar, pregúntese lo siguiente:

  • ¿Qué gastos son esenciales para el bienestar de la familia?
  • ¿Qué gastos tienen prioridad?
  • ¿En qué áreas se puede reducir los gastos para que los gastos familiares se mantengan dentro del ingreso?
  • ¿Cuánto puede usted gastar en cada área de la clasificación?

Ajustar las cantidades que pasa en cada categoría de gastos y escriba la nueva cantidad a su lado.

Paso 3: Balance entre ingreso y egreso

Sume los gastos modificados y compare el total de su ingreso actual. Cuando su ingreso disminuye, puede que sea difícil mantenerse dentro de su ingreso. ¿Qué puede hacer usted si sus gastos son mayores que su ingreso?

  • Corte de gastos.
  • Aumente su ingreso. ¿Qué posibilidades tiene de trabajar medio día o en un trabajo temporal para ayudar a complementar su ingreso? ¿Reúne usted ahora los requisitos para solicitar ayuda de los programas de asistencia pública para necesidades como los alimentos?
  • Mire sus otros activos. ¿Qué otros ahorros, inversiones o propiedad tiene usted que podría usarse o convertirse en efectivo para cubrir sus gastos? Tenga en cuenta que el préstamo y el uso de ahorros pueden ser solamente soluciones temporales.
  • Reduzca sus gastos fijos. Si demasiada cantidad de su ingreso es para cubrir los gastos fijos como el pago de vivienda o de deudas, puede que no haya suficiente dinero para cubrir sus otros gastos básicos. Puede que tenga que refinanciar su préstamo, mudarse a una vivienda más económica o entregar la propiedad a su acreedor para salirse un poco de su deuda.

Una vez que usted tiene un plan de gastos que fija las cantidades de los gastos para las necesidades indispensables familiares y el balance entre los gastos y el ingreso usted tendrá que respetarlo. El tomar notas no es suficiente. Usted debe usar el plan como guía de sus gastos.

Mantenga anotado lo que gasta en cada clasificación de gastos para asegurarse que no se excede de la cantidad en su plan de gastos. Un cuaderno de anotaciones para la familia puede ayudarle a mantener una lista de los gastos y a compararlos con los de su plan de gastos. Los programas computarizados de hojas de cálculos y las aplicaciones para teléfonos son opciones para llevar el control de los gastos también. Al mantener anotado en un registro lo que se ha gastado más fácil será controlar sus gastos y vivir con su ingreso.

Por más información visita este sitio web: z.umn.edu/afimpact/

Featured Resources

Latino man, woman, and child

Setting Spending Priorities

Listen and learn how a spending plan can help you pay your bills. English | español

Planning to $tay Ahead


A spending and savings plan (sometimes called a “budget”) is a way to divide your
available money to meet your needs and wants.

Why have a spending plan?

Families say that making a spending and savings plan helps them feel as if they’re
more in charge of their money. They say that it helps them:

  • Stretch dollars and get more for their limited money.
  • Work toward their goals with the amount of income that they have.
  • Spend wisely.
  • Set aside a little money each month as savings, or for emergencies.

You can make a spending plan by following these steps.

  • Step 1: Know how much money you have coming in each month.
  • Step 2: Find out how you usually spend your money.
  • Step 3: Make a plan for how you will spend your money in the future.
    • Your spending plan might include ideas for how to meet your needs and wants for less money.
    • A spending plan includes a way to put some money aside for unexpected expenses.
    • A spending plan for your family should include ways to meet goals.

An important part of making a spending plan work is keeping track of bills that you have and paying them on time. Here are some hints:

  • Decide who will pay bills, and choose one place to keep records and bills.
  • Open a bill as soon as it comes. Look at the due date. Write it on your calendar. Then put it in a safe place with other bills.
  • Pay bills on time to avoid late fees and interest costs. Have a regular time each week to check the bills that need to be paid.
  • When paying bills by mail, use personal checks or money orders. Do not send cash. Some banks offer free or low-cost checking accounts.
  • Get a receipt when you pay in person with cash.
  • Keep receipts for large expense items, or items that you may need to return.

When you are short on cash, beware of payday loans. Payday loans are an expensive way to get cash. With these loans, the borrower writes a check to a payday loan or check-loan business for the loan amount plus a fee. The lender agrees to hold the check until the date the loan is due. On the due date, the lender deposits the check or you can give the check-loan business the amount due in cash or money order and get your check back from them.

Check-loan businesses are required by law to tell the consumer the cost of the loan — both in a dollar amount and as an Annual Percentage Rate (APR). Let’s say you write a personal check for $120 to borrow $100 for up to 14 days. This $20 finance charge is an annual percentage rate of 521 percent!

Although they are a convenient way to obtain short-term cash, payday loans can put you deeper in debt. Consider other options before choosing a payday loan:

  • Check out the cost of a loan from a bank, savings and loan institution, or credit union.
  • Find out the APR for a cash advance on your credit card.
  • If it’s a utility bill that’s due, check first with the utility company about emergency assistance programs.
  • Ask your creditors for more time to pay your bills. Be sure to find out what the charge will be for paying late.
  • If you’re having trouble paying bills, seek debt counseling.

Better management of money may help avoid the need for payday loans. Tracking income and expenses can help borrowers develop a spending plan that includes savings and emergencies.

For more information, visit our website at z.umn.edu/afimpact/.

Planear para $alir Adelante


Un plan de gastos y ahorros (a veces se llama un “presupuesto”) es una manera de distribuir el dinero que tiene disponible para satisfacer sus necesidades y deseos.

¿Por qué es importante un plan de gastos?

Hay familias que dicen que cuando preparan un plan de gastos y ahorros sienten que tienen más control de su dinero. Por ejemplo, les ayuda a:

  • Estirar el dinero para obtener más con sus limitados ingresos.
  • Lograr sus objectivos con la cantidad de ingresos que tienen.
  • Gastar con prudencia.
  • Guardar una pequeña cantidad de dinero cada mes para ahorros o emergencias.

Usted puede crear un plan de gastos siguiendo los siguientes pasos.

  • Paso 1: Saber cuánto dinero tendrá disponible cada mes.
  • Paso 2: Averiguar como gasta su dinero usualmente.
  • Paso 3: Preparar un plan para determinar como gastará su dinero en el futuro.
    • Su plan de gastos puede incluir ideas de cómo satisfacer sus necesidades y deseos con menos dinero.
    • Un plan de gastos incluye una método para guardar una cantidad de dinero para gastos imprevistos.
    • Un plan de gastos para su familia debe incluir un método de cumplir los objetivos de la familia.

Para que un plan de gastos funcione bien es necesario saber cuáles son las cuentas que usted tiene y pagarlas a tiempo. Estos son algunos consejos:

  • Decida quién pagará las cuentas, y escoja un lugar para guardar los documentos y cuentas.
  • Abra las cuentas tan pronto lleguen. Fíjese en la fecha de vencimiento. Anótela en su calendario. Después póngala en un lugar seguro con las otras cuentas.
  • Pague las cuentas a tiempo para evitar multas y costos de intereses. Deje un día específico cada semana para revisar las cuentas que debe pagar.
  • Cuando paga las cuentas por correo, utilice cheques personales o giros postales. No envie efectivo. Algunos bancos ofrecen cuentas corrientes gratis o de bajo costo.
  • Pida un recibo cuando paga en persona con efectivo.
  • Guarde los recibos para artículos caros o artículos que tal vez tenga que devolver.

Cuando usted está corto de dinero, cuidado con los préstamos del día de pago. Préstamos del día de pago son una manera de obtener efectivo muy cara. Con estos préstamos, el prestatario escribe un cheque a la empresa de préstamos del día de pago para la cantidad del préstamo más un cargo. El prestamista promete guardar el cheque hasta la fecha de vencimiento del cheque. En la fecha de vencimiento, el prestamista deposita el cheque o usted puede pagarle a la empresa de préstamos la cantidad pendiente en efectivo o giro postal y obtener su cheque de vuelta.

La ley obliga a las empresas prestamistas a decirle al consumidor el costo del préstamo — tanto la cantidad en dólares como la tasa de interés anual (APR por sus siglas en inglés). Digamos que usted escribe un cheque por $120 para pedir prestado $100 por hasta 14 días. ¡Este cargo de financiamiento de $20 es una tasa de interés anual de 521 por ciento!

Aunque es una manera conveniente de obtener efectivo al corto plazo, los préstamos el día de pago pueden endeudarle más. Considere otras opciones antes de escoger un préstamo del día de pago:

  • Investigue el costo de un préstamo de un banco, asociación de ahorro y crédito inmobiliario o unión crediticia.
  • Averigüe la tasa de interés anual de un adelanto de efectivo en su tarjeta de crédito.
  • Si es una cuenta para un servicio público que tiene que pagar, solicite información en la empresa de servicios públicos sobre programas de asistencia para emergencias.
  • Solicite más tiempo a sus acreedores para pagar sus cuentas. Asegúrese averiguar ual será el cargo por pagos atrasados.
  • Si se le está dificultando pagar sus cuentas a tiempo, solicite asesoramiento en la liquidación de deudas.

Una mejor administración de su dinero puede evitar la necesidad de préstamos del día de pago. El seguir la pista de sus ingresos y gastos puede ayudar a los prestatarios a formular un plan de gastos que incluye ahorros para emergencias.

Por más información visita este sitio web: z.umn.edu/afimpact/.

Planning to $tay Ahead Podcast

Get tips for planning and making the most of your money. Audio in English | español


Financial Decisions That Can Help

Adjusting to Suddenly Reduced Income (9.87 MB PDF) — Take into account the financial, emotional, and social aspects of sudden income loss.

Changing Spending to Live with Reduced Income (video; 2:38) — Take charge of your financial situation immediately after a layoff.

Facing Financial Uncertainty? Take Action Now.Lutheran Social Services — Five key actions, additional options when facing financial hardship, and top ten questions to ask your employer before your last day of work.

Track Your Spending

Tracking Your SpendingIowa State University Extension — Manage your money with one of these six tracking methods: receipt, calendar, envelope, checkbook, account book, or computer software program. English | español

Action Page 3-1: Keeping Track of Your Spending — Tool you can use to help you track your spending, an important step in better understanding your finances and making changes as needed. Part of Dollar Works 2: A Personal Financial Education Program. English (205 K PDF) | español (238 K PDF)

Make a Spending Plan

Setting Spending Priorities — You'll need to develop a spending plan to help you pay your bills if your income is reduced. Part of the Getting Through Tough Times series. English | español

Planning to $tay AheadIowa State University Extension — Step by step method to develop a spending and savings plan and tips for making the most of your money. English | español

Action Page 3-4: Spending Plan — Short Form — Tool you can use to create a spending and saving plan, an important step in better understanding your finances and making changes as needed. Part of Dollar Works 2: A Personal Financial Education Program. English (222 K PDF) | español (277 K PDF)

Facing Financial Uncertainty? Prioritize!Lutheran Social Services — Facing financial uncertainty? Prioritizing your expenses is the first place to start.

Take Control

Strategies for Spending Less — When your family faces reduced income, take immediate action to stop all excess spending. Part of the Getting Through Tough Times series.

Deciding Which Bills to Pay First — Guide to prioritizing your bill paying and spending habits. Part of the Getting Through Tough Times series.

Talking With Creditors — Reduce your chances of being harassed by creditors or collection agencies by working out solutions for debt repayment early. Part of the Getting Through Tough Times series.

Making the Most of What You Have — Look at your total financial picture and determine which assets you might use to meet family obligations. Part of the Getting Through Tough Times series.

Securing Your Resources

Resource List for Consumers — A tool to help you identify and locate information and services to make informed decisions, take positive action, and create significant outcomes in your life. (Most resources apply to Minnesota audiences only.)

Facing Financial Uncertainty? Find Resources!Lutheran Social Services — 10 key resources to help bridge financial gaps. (For Minnesota audiences only.)

Keeping a Roof Overhead — When family income drops, careful planning can help you avoid eviction from your rental unit or the loss of your house. Part of the Getting Through Tough Times series.

Bartering — Swapping resources with others is a time-tested way to stay in control when money is tight. Part of the Getting Through Tough Times series.

Meeting Your Insurance Needs — Insurance is the primary way you protect yourself against financial loss caused by illness, accidents and other destructive or damaging events. Part of the Getting Through Tough Times series.

Shop and Save — Stretch your food dollars with our tips and resources. English | español

Children and Income Loss

Communication: Money MechanicsIowa State University Extension — Talking about money isn’t easy but this publication has tips to start your family communicating. Also includes a plan to reach financial goals and a “talk about money” quiz.

How You Can Help Mom or Dad — Ways children can help your family during difficult financial times. Part of the Getting Through Tough Times series.

Deciding if Teens Should Work — Weigh the pros and cons of whether your teen should work when the family falls on hard financial times. Part of the Getting Through Tough Times series.

I Need to Get a Job — Reviews the research about teens seeking and holding a job. English | español

Related Resources

Coping with UnemploymentIowa State University Extension — Taking charge of a job loss means taking stock of your resources to survive the immediate situation and bring about a positive future. Part of the Stress: Taking Charge series.

Action Page 3-6: Poverty Income Guidelines — Get a summary of the poverty income guidelines and levels needed to qualify for federal and Minnesota-based assistance programs. Part of Dollar Works 2: A Personal Financial Education Program. This is the version for the most recent tax year, formatted for handouts. English (178 K PDF) | español (274 K PDF)

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) — Helping Minnesotans with limited financial resources make the healthy choice the easy choice.

Stretch Food Dollars with Tips from University of Minnesota Extension (294 K PDF) — Download and distribute this news release on common high-cost habits and cost-cutting strategies.

GovBenefits.gov — The official benefits website of the U.S. government provides easily accessible information on over 1,000 benefit and assistance programs.

Disaster Recovery — Assists families who have experienced a disaster and the professionals who help them.

The Financial Side of Family Transition — Even if you are comfortable with all of the changes, you will still probably experience financial upheaval after a divorce or separation. Get tools and information on specific financial situations that you may encounter after a family transition.

  • © Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
  • The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. Privacy